Hosting a Clinic

You could have cut-rate or free tuition, make loads of money for yourself or a charity, and spread the word about how great this kind of horsemanship is, all at once!

Over the years, several people have hosted clinics for Adam (at the current time it is unlikely Nicole would be involved- but email us to see our thoughts about any proposal you might have). After many attempts at finding a way to make it pay all round, we believe we have a solution that allows you to receive free tuition, or even earn money – potentially a lot of it – by hosting a clinic, with or without hosting a demonstration as well.

Photo: Simon Palmer www.into-the-lens.com

If you wish to keep it small and simply reduce your costs and group together with some friends, then the easy thing is to have a call out, at the usual cost, but to share the cost of travelling between those who are keen to join the learning.

However, there is the potential for much more. You could advertise and spread the word about the visit and charge spectators (we recommend this charge is kept small, say £2.50 per hour, to encourage people to take it up, but all the charges are at your discretion. They should take into account the standard of the venue’s facilities, for example, whether the arena is of good quality, indoors or out, has toilets, tea making etc).

Adam would charge his usual rate for travel and teaching, with the usual ceiling of £475 per day being the most likely amount it would cost; it could be less especially if you are not too far away. His charge might also include coming the day before the clinic (£50 plus accommodation costs if applicable). Otherwise he would, as usual, expect to leave home (GL7 7EB) at 9 AM and begin when he arrives with you. For £475 he would expect to teach up to 8 hours of lessons in a day, depending on light. Extra lessons above 8 hours would be charged extra in this instance.

The best photos are by Simon Palmer www.into-the-lens.com

You are recommended to charge each rider a surcharge on the usual £46/hr, adding the cost of travel divided among the number of riders, unless you prefer to attempt to cover that cost with spectators’ fees. Bear in mind if you are a long way away, and wish him to do so, Adam charges £50 to come the day before as well as costs of staying in B+B accommodation in your local area (if you have a suitable alternative such as someone with an annexe or holiday home that may be agreed upon) – but you would pocket all the spectator fees, and anything above the £475 (+ overnight expenses if applicable) would be collected by yourself.

Please note, that the cost of hiring a venue (if applicable), which must be borne by the hiring party, can make it much harder to make this a practical, profitable endeavour. If there are going to be more than a few (say 10-15) spectators, realistically you will need an indoor venue. However, this is not absolutely a requirement except at winter time.

If you host a clinic we will expect you to provide weather like this. PHOTO: Simon Palmer www.into-the-lens.com

We strongly recommend all spectators are made to pay a non-refundable deposit in advance or to pay double on the door (you will need to have all their contact details to be able to call in the event of a cancellation). Likewise, all riders must pay fully for the time they expect to take in advance. If their horse is not able to perform, they will then simply find another one. Otherwise, a cancellation like this can ruin all your plans (and ours!)

Getting enough riders can be tricky, and having the number of spectators you need to turn a profit calls for a lot of effort unless you are in a position to spread the word easily. You might prefer to settle for a smaller event like a clinic, However, a solution may be at hand- how about hosting a demo and clinic together? Read on!